updates


Hello there, you look amazing today!

Lia/infj/writer and classical music enthusiast

currently reading: The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

©

loveth-thy-earth:

I will be participating in the Out of the Darkness Suicide Prevention Walk in Philadelphia on October 5, 2014. I am participating in order to raise and donate money to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.
Personally, I think supporting awareness of mental health issues and helping…

pixography:

Rene Magritte ~ “The Human Condition”, 1933

Two of Magritte’s favored themes were the “window painting” and the “painting within a painting”.  The Human Condition is one of Magritte’s earliest treatments of either subject, and in it he combines the two, making what may be his most subtle and profound statement of their shared meaning.
The Human Condition displays an easel placed inside a room and in front of a window. The easel holds an unframed painting of a landscape that seems in every detail contiguous with the landscape seen outside the window. At first, one automatically assumes that the painting on the easel depicts the portion of the landscape outside the window that it hides from view. After a moment’s consideration, however, one realizes that this assumption is based upon a false premise: that is, that the imagery of Magritte’s painting is real, while the painting on the easel is a representation of that reality. In fact, there is no difference between them. Both are part of the same painting, the same artistic fabrication. It is perhaps to this repeating cycle, in which the viewer, even against his will, sees the one as real and the other as representation, that Magritte’s title makes reference. <renemagritte.org>

pixography:

Rene Magritte ~ “The Human Condition”, 1933

Two of Magritte’s favored themes were the “window painting” and the “painting within a painting”.  The Human Condition is one of Magritte’s earliest treatments of either subject, and in it he combines the two, making what may be his most subtle and profound statement of their shared meaning.

The Human Condition displays an easel placed inside a room and in front of a window. The easel holds an unframed painting of a landscape that seems in every detail contiguous with the landscape seen outside the window. At first, one automatically assumes that the painting on the easel depicts the portion of the landscape outside the window that it hides from view. After a moment’s consideration, however, one realizes that this assumption is based upon a false premise: that is, that the imagery of Magritte’s painting is real, while the painting on the easel is a representation of that reality. In fact, there is no difference between them. Both are part of the same painting, the same artistic fabrication. It is perhaps to this repeating cycle, in which the viewer, even against his will, sees the one as real and the other as representation, that Magritte’s title makes reference. <renemagritte.org>

Anonymous said:
Hi there! No, you asked for a last couple of people to join and i was first to ask. But it's fine love, what's not meant to be just isn't meant to be. Thanks for looking into it though! x

Really? I’ll check on that, and maybe message you again soon. I’m sorry it somehow didn’t work out but thank you for understanding!

but also, I can’t wait for my music project class and for chemistry and psychology ahh it’s so weird how enthusiastic I can be about school?

taylerdoesnyfw:

Nyamuoch Girwath, Backstage at Chromat SS2015
Photo: Tayler Smith

taylerdoesnyfw:

Nyamuoch Girwath, Backstage at Chromat SS2015

Photo: Tayler Smith

softwaring:

Mt Hood and Mt Everest’s summit shadows

classic-art:

A Windy Day at Veneux
Alfred Sisley, 1882

classic-art:

A Windy Day at Veneux

Alfred Sisley, 1882

Anonymous said:
what did ur pe teacher do?

uh we’ve got football (soccer) with him and we’re half girls and half boys and the first thing he said was “I want to know, girls, why the hell did you apply for football?” and then every girl had to reply and he noted down what we said. Guess what? Of course he didn’t ask the boys because boys playing football is the most normal thing in the wolrd but girls, of course, can’t. well, after rambling about how girls should be in volleyball (“the bad thing about volleyball, though, is that you might snap your fingernails, of course”) he told the boys to practise in another room (because boys are obviously better at playing football and can therefore practise alone, sure) and watched us girls throughout the whole lesson. He was even a tiny bit nice at the end saying he has had “worse girl classes”

m-i-s-o:

Miso&#160;: Home-Made Tattoos&#160;: Emma’s galaxy arms&#160;: Melbourne, 2014

m-i-s-o:

Miso : Home-Made Tattoos : Emma’s galaxy arms : Melbourne, 2014

you blog is the definition of perfect. holy sweet sticks i'm so glad i discovered it xx

Thank you!! thank you so much, that’s very lovely!

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